Senior Fraud: “Incorrigible Leech” Almost Struck Again in Victoria

I just discovered that this man has been preying on new clients of Act Together Moving Services. He developed a “friendship” and gained their trust by helping them with odd jobs and hauling. Luckily his history of defrauding seniors was discovered and contact has been cut off before he was able to do them too much harm.

This man is still living and possibly defrauding other seniors in Victoria. Please read this Times Colonist article so you recognize him when you see him! And please share with any seniors you know.

aroundtown-pro-am-jpgA B.C. Supreme Court justice called a Victoria man “an incorrigible leech” and ordered him to vacate a wealthy elderly widow’s property this week and repay her $140,000 for lost investments, unpaid rent, personal loans and a car.

 

Moving With Dementia

Ting and I attended a very informative training this week put on by the Alzheimer Society. dementia_friendsWe found out the number of people who live with dementia in BC is over 70,000 and the risk for dementia doubles every five years after age 65.

Since our clientele is generally 75-105 years old, we need to recognize the signs of dementia and incorporate special techniques into our moving services to maximize the health and safety of our clients. We also need to use our experience and training to help family members avoid common pitfalls during the move.

about-promo-involveThe changes caused by moving from a familiar home to brand new surroundings can be terribly disorienting for anyone, much less for a person with memory loss and challenges with problem-solving.
If you’re facing this situation, this article from the Mayo Clinic offers great advice on how to prepare for a loved one’s move.

We wholeheartedly agree with all of the ideas in this article. Most importantly, when moving a person with dementia, special care and attention should be taken to prepare for the move, coordinate the move itself, and follow-up during the first few months after the move so that the transition can be as safe, healthy and low-stress as possible.

Resources:

Alzheimer’s: Smoothing the transition on moving day

Alzheimer Society of BC


We Can Help

In our community, many elderly people do not have family members living nearby who can take these extra steps to make the transition as comfortable as possible for them. The good new is, we can help. We can also provide support to caregivers who need an extra set of hands on move day, advice on how to set up the new home, or we can get rid of things that can’t fit into the new home. Give us a call to find out more.

Act Together Moving Services

Don’t Call It Junk

Anney-smallWe are helping a family move their elderly mother this week and I’m amazed at how much respect her daughters have for every singe item in her home. Sometimes adult children only see junk, but these daughters see treasure in their mother’s stacks and piles.

Of course this means the house can’t be cleared out in one day…this project is going to take a lot of work.

I saw this movie recently that depicts how badly kids can misjudge the value of their mother’s stuff, with hilarious consequences.

Lance Daly’s “Life’s a Breeze” is as amiable and windswept as its title promises, for better or worse. One wishes it gusted a bit more often, but the always-great…
ROGEREBERT.COM|BY BRIAN TALLERICO

Aging In Victoria Seminars

Anney-small“I had no idea.” I hear that over and over when helping clients and their families to navigate the dizzying senior housing options in Victoria.

And it doesn’t stop with housing. As my clients get older, it becomes harder for them to cope with the health system. Ask any senior who is trying to find a GP that is accepting new patients…it seems impossible.

That’s why I’ve teamed up other experts to put on free seminars over the next two weeks. The seminars range in topic from hidden costs that hit seniors, to housing options and aging in place, to healthy aging strategies.

The format we will follow is a collaborative panel discussion, followed by questions and input from the audience. We are there to share what we have learned from years of working in our respective industries, and also to learn from people who are navigating through their retirement.

These seminars are free, and include delicious refreshments!

I hope you can join us to learn and share.


Seminar 1: Making a Financial Plan

Our panel will discuss the various costs facing the elderly, ranging from housing, health care, aging in place and more.

Saturday, April 25th, 2:00pm – 3:30pm

Location: The Kensington 3965 Shelbourne St Victoria

Panel: Barbra Hopkins (Sun Life Financial)Nolan Adam (Sands Funeral Chapel) & Farhan Kanji (Heart Pharmacy).

Seating is limited. Call The Kensington today to reserve your spot! 250-477-1232


Seminar 2: Senior Housing Options

Our panel will discuss topics ranging from real estate, retirement housing options, VIHA (Island Health) and more.

Thursday, April 30th, 7:00pm – 8:30pm

Location: The Kensington 3965 Shelbourne St Victoria

Panel: Tony Joe (RE/MAX Camosun)Anney Ardiel (Act Together Moving Services).

Seating is limited. Call The Kensington today to reserve your spot! 250-477-1232


Seminar 3: Staying Healthy and Safe

Our panel will discuss safety at home, prescription management, exercise and nutrition and community resources.

Wednesday, May 6th, 2:00pm – 3:30pm

Location: The Kensington 3965 Shelbourne St Victoria

Panel: Richard Major (Motion Specialties)Brecon Gage (Comfort Keepers) Farhan Kanji (Heart Pharmacy).

Seating is limited. Call The Kensington today to reserve your spot! 250-477-1232

Moving Family: How to Make It Better

We are constantly inspired by our clients.They have lived through wars, depressions, revolutions and personal loss. When I say downsizing isn’t for wimps, I’m talking about this tough generation.
But when faced with having to give up personal treasures, collections and mementos from the past, even the toughest person can break down. Not only the sheer volume of stuff that needs to be dealt with can be terrifying, but the physical task of sorting, boxing things up and hauling them away is impossible to fathom.

wheelchair-man-windows.jpg

Emotional Drain
Then add in the emotional drain of losing everything they hold dear, piece by piece. Each personal item might hold heavy meaning that hasn’t been fully processed, or reinforce a past loss, or remind them of their failing health.
It’s common for us to see adult children get frustrated by their parent’s behavior during the downsizing process. It is often a struggle for family members to remain patient during this process and emotions can run high.

This Might Help
If you are helping someone to downsize, here are some ideas that might help when your frustration starts to bubble over.
  • Reflect on how this process is impacting your own sense of loss and identity, so that you can stay aware of your reactions. This might help you to remain calm and supportive rather than adding to the emotional turmoil in the house.
  • Keep visits positive and upbeat, and remind your parents that you are on their team and that you want the best for them.
  • if you feel yourself getting to the boiling point, change the channel. Pop out to your car to “grab something” and make a quick phone call to a supportive friend. Declare break time and make a cup of tea. Do something to lift your own mood.
  • Keep “sorting sessions” to under two hours. Emotional fatigue that stems from too much decision-making can lead to someone saying something they might regret.
If all else fails, call in objective downsizing professionals like Act Together Moving Services to consult. We’re trained to make this process go smoothly, and almost everyone behaves better when there is a guest in the house!