Linen Closets: An Endangered Species

2014-11-07 15.39.42One of the strangest things about retirement residences is that they don’t all have linen closets in their suites. At first glance it makes sense that they are left out, after all, a person living in a place with weekly linen service would only need two, maybe three sets of sheets and a few towels, so why would you need a linen closet right? Think again!

Not only are linen closets a classic hiding place for extra toilet paper, household supplies and knick-nacks, they are also a tradition. A household fixture. Although linen closets are typically cluttered and disorganized, most of the elderly clients we move expect they will have one in their new place. Sadly, at least 75% of the suites we move clients into do not.

With that in mind, we have developed 5 tips to keep linens in their proper place.

  1. It’s time to pare down: Choose two or three sets of your most comfortable, nicest sheets and towels, and donate or dispose of the rest. If sheets are not torn or stained, most charity shops will be glad to receive them. In Victoria, Anney’s Closet is always in need of twin, double or queen sized sets in good shape.
  2. Evaluate your table cloths: Will you still use them? Do you find it difficult to wash, fold and iron them? Now might be the time to gift them, sell them or donate them.
  3. Pillow talk: extra pillows take up valuable space in small spaces. Perhaps you can pick out two of the very nicest, most comfortable pillows you have and re-purpose the rest. Good Housekeeping Magazine says if you can fold your pillow in half, it’s time for a new pillow! Read more about how to know when it’s time for a new pillow here.
  4. Knick-nacks need a home: You’ll need a place for all those loose odds and ends, such as light bulbs (keep one or two for emergencies), air fresheners, dust cloths, spare picture hooks, tape, etc. A few small but sturdy baskets from the Dollar Store will keep those small items tidy on a shelf in your clothes closet or under the sink.
  5. Don’t keep it together: It might be time for a new approach to storing linens. Consider keeping your towels in the bathroom cupboard or shelf and your linens in your bedroom closet. You might find it strange to split everything up at first, but having a fresh towel at your fingertips in the bathroom can really come in handy. This way you can utilize your storage spaces more efficiently and streamline your life at the same time.

Anney-smallpat-smallSiblings Anney Ardiel and Patrick Fagan run Act Together Moving Services, a small business that provides a specialized moving service to seniors in Victoria and White Rock, British Columbia.

Anney and Patrick work daily with families and elderly individuals, movers, realtors and stagers, retirement residences and hospitals, auctions and furniture buyers, storage facilities, tradespeople, notaries, lawyers, accountants, charities, thrift shops and the list goes on.

We like to talk about moving.

Our Services

What Our Clients Say

Work With Us

Our A+ rating with Better Business Bureau

Anney-smallToday I want to let the world know that we have an A+ rating with the BBB!

We’ve achieved this rating because we have absolutely no issues with anybody. Since we started Act Together Moving Services in 2011, we have had no complaints regarding our Advertising and Sales, or Billing, or Collection Issues, or Problems with Service Delivery, or Guarantee Issues…all categories that the Better Business Bureau tracks through their system.

We’ve worked hard to follow the BBB Standards for Trust, eight principles that summarize important elements of creating and maintaining trust in business.

Here they are:

Build Trust
Establish and maintain a positive track record in the marketplace.

Advertise Honestly
Adhere to established standards of advertising and selling.

Tell the Truth
Honestly represent products and services, including clear and adequate disclosures of all material terms.

Be Transparent
Openly identify the nature, location, and ownership of the business, and clearly disclose all policies, guarantees and procedures that bear on a customer’s decision to buy.

Honor Promises
Abide by all written agreements and verbal representations.

Be Responsive
Address marketplace disputes quickly, professionally, and in good faith.

Safeguard Privacy
Protect any data collected against mishandling and fraud, collect personal information only as needed, and respect the preferences of consumers regarding the use of their information.

Embody Integrity
Approach all business dealings, marketplace transactions and commitments with integrity.

Don’t Call It Junk

Anney-smallWe are helping a family move their elderly mother this week and I’m amazed at how much respect her daughters have for every singe item in her home. Sometimes adult children only see junk, but these daughters see treasure in their mother’s stacks and piles.

Of course this means the house can’t be cleared out in one day…this project is going to take a lot of work.

I saw this movie recently that depicts how badly kids can misjudge the value of their mother’s stuff, with hilarious consequences.

Lance Daly’s “Life’s a Breeze” is as amiable and windswept as its title promises, for better or worse. One wishes it gusted a bit more often, but the always-great…
ROGEREBERT.COM|BY BRIAN TALLERICO
White Rock is in Good Hands

White Rock is in Good Hands

Congratulations to Patrick for the outstanding growth our White Rock/Lower Mainland office has achieved since he opened it in January 2013.
It’s not easy to grow this fast while keeping such a high standard of service. He just got this rave review from a client:
“It gives me the greatest pleasure to have an opportunity to testify to the sterling qualities of Patrick Fagan and his company. I moved from Vernon down to Surrey, and I couldn’t have been more pleased with the efficient way things were packed and shipped, not one thing was broken or damaged.
If you have a move to make, I would suggest your first move would be to call Pat. I guarantee you will be satisfied.”
-Arthur R. Kilgour

Thanks for the great review Arthur, we really appreciate the feedback!

Act Together Moving Services's photo.

Aging In Victoria Seminars

Anney-small“I had no idea.” I hear that over and over when helping clients and their families to navigate the dizzying senior housing options in Victoria.

And it doesn’t stop with housing. As my clients get older, it becomes harder for them to cope with the health system. Ask any senior who is trying to find a GP that is accepting new patients…it seems impossible.

That’s why I’ve teamed up other experts to put on free seminars over the next two weeks. The seminars range in topic from hidden costs that hit seniors, to housing options and aging in place, to healthy aging strategies.

The format we will follow is a collaborative panel discussion, followed by questions and input from the audience. We are there to share what we have learned from years of working in our respective industries, and also to learn from people who are navigating through their retirement.

These seminars are free, and include delicious refreshments!

I hope you can join us to learn and share.


Seminar 1: Making a Financial Plan

Our panel will discuss the various costs facing the elderly, ranging from housing, health care, aging in place and more.

Saturday, April 25th, 2:00pm – 3:30pm

Location: The Kensington 3965 Shelbourne St Victoria

Panel: Barbra Hopkins (Sun Life Financial)Nolan Adam (Sands Funeral Chapel) & Farhan Kanji (Heart Pharmacy).

Seating is limited. Call The Kensington today to reserve your spot! 250-477-1232


Seminar 2: Senior Housing Options

Our panel will discuss topics ranging from real estate, retirement housing options, VIHA (Island Health) and more.

Thursday, April 30th, 7:00pm – 8:30pm

Location: The Kensington 3965 Shelbourne St Victoria

Panel: Tony Joe (RE/MAX Camosun)Anney Ardiel (Act Together Moving Services).

Seating is limited. Call The Kensington today to reserve your spot! 250-477-1232


Seminar 3: Staying Healthy and Safe

Our panel will discuss safety at home, prescription management, exercise and nutrition and community resources.

Wednesday, May 6th, 2:00pm – 3:30pm

Location: The Kensington 3965 Shelbourne St Victoria

Panel: Richard Major (Motion Specialties)Brecon Gage (Comfort Keepers) Farhan Kanji (Heart Pharmacy).

Seating is limited. Call The Kensington today to reserve your spot! 250-477-1232

The Golden Years…Because They Cost So Much?

Anney-small
When David Bowie sang “Nothing’s gonna touch you in these golden years,” I have a pretty good hunch that he wasn’t referring to the period of life between the ages of 65 and 80+.

For most of us, the “golden years” refer to that period of retirement, when the kids have moved out, debts are paid off and careers have wound down. If you are in good shape financially, physically and mentally, your years past age 65 can indeed be golden.

These years can, however, can be far from golden for some. People can be at their most vulnerable in the following areas:
1. Health Concerns
senior-man-gym.jpgThese are the years when chronic illness, weight gain, reduced muscle mass, changes in hearing and eyesight, memory disorders and other health concerns rear their ugly heads. At the same time our body’s ability to self-repair becomes reduced as we age.
2. Money Matters
Most people rely on a fixed income after retirement, usually a combination of government pension (OAS/GIS, CPP), workplace pensions and RRSPs, and investment income.
The financial risks people face during the golden years include:
  • Will the value of their pensions and investments change?
  • As they age, will their income be able to cover the changing costs of housing, health care, and assistance required for the daily acts of living?
  • Will their financial reserves last long enough, or will they outlive their expected lifespan?
  • Will the death of a partner or spouse alter their financial situation?
  • Will they be able to leave behind something for the kids?
3. Housing Woes
Vulnerabilities in housing can overturn the apple cart of the golden years. Worries include:
Can I afford rising property taxes, maintenance and adaptations?
woman-mowing-lawn.jpg

I commonly hear of “house-poor” seniors who are just barely holding on to ownership of their house. Although rising property values will benefit them when it comes time to sell, if they want to remain living in their house they have to pay the rising taxes, keep up with repairs and pay for costly upgrades and adaptations to “age in place”.
Can I sell my condo? I hear the market is terrible.

In reality, condos can receive multiple offers if priced correctly and marketed well. The wise move is to get advice on real estate from experts before spiralling into worry based on rumours.
Rumours abound and everyone has a friend who says it’s impossible to sell in this market. What will happen if an individual needs to move into more appropriate housing due to health, but finds that their home sits on the market for months or years?
If I sell, can I find a nice place to rent?
If someone has owned their own house for many years the thought of renting can be off-putting. Sharing close quarters with neighbours, dealing with landlords and the many uncertainties of tenancy can be a real turn-off. And in many urban centres the amount of rental inventory in nice neighbourhoods is low.
The Golden Years come with some heavy stuff…and perhaps they’re not as golden as we’ve been led to believe.